A couple of you asked about my offhand reference to an Israeli book deal a few days back. It now appears to be a go. Blindsight, by Peter Watts, is being translated into Hebrew by Kitdmat Eden, of which I know little beyond the fact that they put out some very nice cover designs. Or rather,


is being is being translated into Hebrew by Kitdmat Eden, of which I know little beyond the fact that they put out some very nice cover designs.

I can only hope that Blindsight‘s message of hope and universal harmony might help in some small way to bring peace to the Middle East.

This entry was written by Peter Watts , posted on Thursday September 18 2008at 11:09 am , filed under writing news . Bookmark the permalink . Post a comment below or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

8 Responses to “”

  1. Feeling a bit snarky, today, are we?

  2. What? No! I’m actually feeling pretty good today, nestled as I am between the point where I sent my damn space-opera story off and the point where the editor writes back to tell me it sucks.

    What did I say to sound snarky?

  3. I bet a plague of vampires would settle shit down nicely, if nothing else.

  4. Blindsight the neurological phenomenon is usually referred to as ראייה עיוורת, not ראיית עוורון. (that’s “blind sight” rather than “blindness sight”).
    Hope they don’t botch the technical terms in the translation.

  5. The web site is kidmateden.com, and the Hebrew spelling קדמת עדן also indicates a voiced (rather than voiceless) alveolar plosive sound.

  6. And for what it’s worth, Kidmat Eden seems to mean East of Eden, which is of course a reference to Genesis 4:16.

  7. Dotan Dimet said…

    Blindsight the neurological phenomenon is usually referred to as ראייה עיוורת, not ראיית עוורון. (that’s “blind sight” rather than “blindness sight”).

    Thanks for picking that up — I'ved passed the info on to the publisher.

    And Ross said…

    The web site is kidmateden.com…

    Thanks for catching that.

  8. The Pe- in “פטר” looks to me more like Pedro and not like Peeeeter.
    If you put an extra Yud (‘י’) it’d be more obvious, like this: “פיטר”