Unclouded by Conscience, Remorse, or Delusions of Morality.

hplusAt least, that’s how Paul McEnery describes the “viscera of human relationships” presented throughout my novels in his intro to my interview in the latest issue of h+.  The man treats me well:  the interview itself is chopped way down from our original Q&A (which makes some of my answers seem a bit, well, jittery), but his intro is both  very kind and visceral in its own right.  I heartily approve of “The Overextended Phenotype” as a title,  a nifty little reference both to Dawkins and to my rifters.  (“Neurogunk”, maybe I’m not so sold on.)  And as an added bonus, McEnery opens the article that follows— “Pathology Precedes Potential”— with a nice little tie-in relating the esoteric themes in my work to their mainstream incarnations in shows like House, Dexter, and Battlestar Galactica1.  Anybody who publicly invokes my name to lead in to those shows has got a free pitcher coming to him should we ever end up in the same hotel bar.

And h+ overall?  Very slick, and freely available (this issue at least) in online and  downloadable PDF formats, although the layout— right down to ad design and faux-page-turning effects— strongly suggests old-school dead-tree media.  The graphic design is a joy and the content is topical (Vernor Vinge, reputation economies, the usual neuro and cyber stuff)—  although judging by the promotional puff-piece Tara Hunt did on her upcoming book The Whuffie Factor, the articles may not go into a whole lot of depth.

Actually,  what h+ really seems to be channelling is the spirit of eighties-era  Omni.  And in case you’re wondering, I mean that in a good way.  I haven’t yet had a chance to do more than skim the issue, but I intend to give it a thorough working over once these damn stats are out of the way.

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1Which, I am glad to note, seems to have gotten back on track this week after a couple of wobbly missteps.

This entry was written by Peter Watts , posted on Saturday February 28 2009at 11:02 am , filed under ink on art, interviews, public interface . Bookmark the permalink . Post a comment below or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

5 Responses to “Unclouded by Conscience, Remorse, or Delusions of Morality.”

  1. H+ is cool:

    I agree with their article on Spore, however I wonder about the B+ in sociology.

    Their article on financial markets and AI could be read as: “it wouldn’t have happened if we were smart”. Well…

    “Hacking the economy” was more OK, but old news.

    Nano-tattoos will probably rule the world. Cool stuff. Also, thumbs-up for their reporting on the nano-condom, that’s one hell of a news item.

    Oh yes, and your interview was nice. Not unexpected, since it reviews interesting ideas.

    public comment

  2. I can’t say I’ve ever heard of h+, but it seems cool despite having an interview with Harold Bloom (grumble). How does this whole author interviewing business work? Does the interviewer pitch authors he’s a fan of to some editor, or do they get assigned and have to plow through a bunch of material rapidly?

  3. Nick Said:

    How does this whole author interviewing business work? Does the interviewer pitch authors he’s a fan of to some editor, or do they get assigned and have to plow through a bunch of material rapidly?

    I don’t know if there is a hard-and-fast rule, but I’m betting the second option results in more interviews seeing print: I’ve fielded interview requests from a number of enthusiastic fans in high places, from the Wall Street Journal to Israel’s second-largest daily, that have never been published because they couldn’t sell the piece to their editors. Assignments are going to see the light of day more often than pitches,I would think.

  4. I’ve never heard of this particular magazine, but I’d be happy even to subscribe to somebody’s old collection of Omni.

  5. I like neurogunk.

    neuropunk brings to mind cyberpunk and chrome and computers and it just doesn’t fit.

    gunk is good with its messy lab and brain splat connotations. its inhuman wet dreams.